e15 e15 Design und Distributions GmbH

RICHARD HERRE COLLECTION

e15 introduces the Richard Herre Collection and continues its incorporation of designs by protagonists of Modernism.

The prolific architect, interior designer, graphic artist, author and translator Richard Herre has only recently been rediscovered as an important representative of the New Objectivity of the 1920s and as an influential figure in the Stuttgart Werkbund. In close collaboration with the Herre family and the archives, e15 reissues chair STUTTGART and kilim ZET. Created in 1926, the diverse designs illustrate a polarity between the sober forms of New Objectivity and expressive coloration, whilst signifying the imaginative spatial reference of Herre’s work.

The Richard Herre Collection will be exhibited as part of a special exhibition “Richard Herre” at StadtPalais Stuttgart, taking place from 29 November 2019 – 01 March 2020

Chair STUTTGART

Designed in 1926, chair STUTTGART illustrates the geometry and rationality inherent in the expressive aesthetic of Richard Herre. Milled from solid wood, the characteristic curved backrest of STUTTGART embodies traditional craftsmanship and timeless elegance. Available in waxed European oak and walnut, the chair is optionally equipped with a removable seat in textile, leather and Vienna weave. As a work of significant modernity and presence, chair STUTTGART can be used as a sophisticated dining, executive or visitor chair.

Kilim ZET

Kilim ZET is a graphically poignant and chromatically striking design that captures the spirit of 1920s New Objectivity. Richard Herre is considered one of the initiators of the Stuttgart Weissenhof Estate, where he was responsible for the interior architecture of the house designed by Max Taut. Designed in 1926 and specified for the Max Taut Weissenhof house, ZET represents Richard Herre’s exceptional use of colour whilst signifying the imaginative spatial reference of his work. In close collaboration with the Herre family and the archives, e15 re-issues kilim ZET. Available in various colour compositions ZET is made of pure, hand-spun sheep wool combining traditional weaving methods with historic design.

Richard Herre

Richard Herre was born in 1885 and studied architecture in Stuttgart and Munich. In particular before World War I, he struck up close friendships with artists in the Hölzel circle and protagonists of Modernism such as Oskar Schlemmer and Willi Baumeister. He was a member of the artists’ association “Üecht”, for whom he acted as press officer. Together with Richard Döcker, Hugo Keuerleber and Gustav Schleicher, he became a champion of New Objectivity.

As a member of the German Werkbund, he was involved in the Werkbund exhibition “Die Wohnung”, namely the Stuttgart’s Weissenhof Estate, in 1927. He didn’t contribute a building here, but rather masterminded the interior architecture for the house designed by Max Taut, with his work considered to be an imaginative contribution to Modernism.

As an architect, Herre designed just one building, concentrating primarily on the interior architecture. In this regard, he was strongly influenced by the ideas of Adolf Loos, but also by the holistic design ideal of Japanese homes. He created the interior design of numerous private residences, schools and businesses, as well as the Robert Bosch Hospital and Stuttgart’s Ministry of the Interior. For these, he designed furniture and lighting, but also textiles, thus creating complete interiors.

However, he also worked repeatedly as a graphic designer, creating book covers or the famous poster motif for the Werkbund exhibition “Die Form” in 1924. He also composed a number of essays and poems and translated Le Corbusier’s “Modulor” from French to German.

Richard Herre died in 1959, however his highly versatile oeuvre, and his championing of the ideas of Modernism have recently been rediscovered. This is primarily due to his son Frank Herre, an architect who has studied his father’s work intensively and his grandson Max Herre, who is well known as a member of Stuttgart-based hip hop band “Freundeskreis”. The re-editions from e15 are the first of Herre’s designs to be reproduced almost a century after their creation. They demonstrate that compelling designs from early Modernism can still fit perfectly into our present day.

Richard Herre, 1958
Photo: Archiv Richard Herre